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Kirkwood High School Students Part of Winning CAPS Teams

Kirkwood High School Students Part of Winning CAPS Teams 

 

Kirkwood High School students connected to the St. Louis CAPS Engineering & Technology Design and Development course recently participated in the 7th Annual Gateway Arch National Park Engineering Competition to pitch their engineering solutions to a current challenge impacting the grounds of Gateway Arch National Park (GANP). The McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis hosted the event and a panel consisting of current and retired engineers, engineering professors, and Metro St. Louis officials judged the team’s executive summaries and pitches.

 

Kirkwood students Zachary Evans, Aeden Owens and Devon Quello were on a team that won 2nd place overall and tied for Best Executive Summary. They were joined by Conrad Salt from Affton High School, Merim Malkic from Bayless High School, and Nathan Seyer and Joseph Effinger from Oakville High School. The team was awarded $800.00. The group developed a concept for a new system to improve the Mississippi River Boat Tour docks at GANP. Their proposed solution employed a system of automated winches and self-adjusting dock ramps that would automatically adapt in relation to the river level. They also improved dock & ramp aesthetics and utility connections (e.g. water, natural gas, electricity). Their project included cost estimates, timelines and a plan for implementation.  

 

The St. Louis Centers for Advanced Professional Studies (STL CAPS) programs are nationally recognized, innovative high school programs. STL CAPS is an example of how business, community and public education can partner to produce personalized learning experiences that educate the workforce of tomorrow, especially in high skill, high demand jobs.

 

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Photo Caption: (From left) Nathan Seyer, Merim Malkic, Zachary Evans, Conrad Salt and Devon Quello, all students in the St. Louis CAPS Engineering & Technology Design and Development course, recently pitched their engineering solutions to a current challenge impacting the grounds of Gateway Arch National Park as part of the 7th Annual Gateway Arch National Park Engineering Competition. The team won 2nd place overall and tied for Best Executive Summary after their proposal was judged by a panel consisting of current and retired engineers, engineering professors, and Metro-St. Louis officials. The event was hosted by the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University. (Not pictured are Joseph Effinger and Aeden Owens)